The vagaries of time

When you are waiting for a bus in the pouring rain, how endless can each minute seem? Yet when we go to the fairground, the rides are always over too quickly.  In the past I have attended aerobics classes which have seemed agonisingly endless, yet when I am doing or teaching yoga the time flies by.  Our perception of time seems to bear an inverse relationship to the pleasure gained from it; the worst experiences seem to last forever and the best ones are over ‘in no time at all’.

It can be easy to succumb to the habit of spending much of our time on autopilot when doing routine activities.  If you have ever got half way to work and wondered if the door is locked, you were probably on autopilot when you turned the key!  We can tend to fill our time with activities that may numb rather than stimulate.  How many hours spent are browsing online/watching sitcoms/eating or drinking too much as a way of passing time? These things can all be distractions from the reality of each moment.  We all need time out, but sliding automatically into these activities on a regular basis is not always restorative for body or mind.

When we become totally engrossed in whatever we are doing or watching, time appears to stand still.  This is the experience of time I hope to encounter when practising photography as a meditation.  I become so involved with my subject that time is no longer of any importance, far away from the restrictions of minutes and hours, days and weeks, times to be places and times to leave.  It is these moments out of time that become recorded in my images and these moments that give the practice meaning for me.  This sense of spaciousness is remarkably calming.  This feeling can be found in any hobby or interest that absorbs your full attention. Whatever it may be, try it out today!

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